Monday, July 3, 2017

Showing our colors for Canada Day and the Fourth of July

By Sharon Parker
Sharon's Compendium

Both Canada and the U.S. celebrate their nationhood and independence at the beginning of July with picnics and parades and patriotic displays of our national colors — which are, like, two-thirds the same.

Maple leaf rubber stamp from TC Witchcraft Factory
(Click on the captions of any photo to see more info about, and even purchase, the item.)

Canada Day, on July 1, marks the anniversary of the British North America Act of 1867, which joined four provinces, Nova Scotia, New Brunswick, Ontario, and Quebec, to form the Canadian Confederation.

Ink roller style print of Canada, by Mercurial YoYo

Often referred to as Canada's birthday, it marks a major first step on the way to full independence, which was completed in 1982 when Canada's Prime Minister Pierre Trudeau and England's Queen Elizabeth II signed the Proclamation of the Constitution Act, which transferred the power to amend the Canadian constitution to Canada.

Red-and-white striped cotton napkins, for your celebratory picnics, by Shaggy Baggy.
And so this year, Prime Minister Justin Trudeau presides over the 150th anniversary of the beginning of a process that was completed by his father.


Americana cuff by Metaling Susie
Meanwhile in the United States, we celebrate the adoption of our Declaration of Independence on July 4, 1776, by the second Continental Congress, which, to most Americans, is the birthday of our country.

Quilted wall hanging by Hartford Avenue Quilts
But the Continental Congress actually voted for independence on July 2. In fact, John Adams was certain that the second would be the day to celebrate, as he wrote in a letter to his wife, Abigail: " The Second Day of July 1776, will be the most memorable Epocha, in the History of America. I am apt to believe that it will be celebrated, by succeeding Generations, as the great anniversary Festival."


Flag onesie by Bethie Ann Baby

But, for the official record, our founding document was dated July 4, 1776, and so that became the date that we celebrate its adoption. 

American flag dress by Margaret Mousley
Although some sticklers for details would say that our country's official beginning was at the signing of the Treaty of Paris on September 3, 1783, which ended the war between us and Britain, and in which Britain officially recognized the United States as an independent nation.

But if we celebrated our nation's independence on the third of September, what then would we do with Labor Day? Move it to July? 




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